Stephen Calender Programming Blog


Benchmarking: Results

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

Sweet Sweet Benchmarking

A speed comparison across all trials. If you would like to view the full results they are available in cvs, htm, and xls formats.

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Benchmarking: Graphics

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

These trials are concerned with rendering speed as well as common manipulations and methods of art assets. Full Article

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Benchmarking: Data Structure Speed

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

Data structure trials focus on comparing speeds of variables, object types, classes, and the speed at which you can access and modify your data. Full Article

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Benchmarking: Operation Speed

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

The fundamental speed hierarchy, bit shifting < addition < multiplication < division, is true for all languages. However, it is still important to know the speed difference between operations. Furthermore, the basic operations have many different flavors in which they can be written. All of these trials compare basic operation speed, alternative syntax, and mathematical substitutions. Full Article

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Benchmarking: Methodology

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

I know most of the die-hard critics our there are going to want to see my code, and that is perfectly acceptable. As I have already stated myself, many of the people trying to figure out this black box do a poor job. Just do not expect all of my code to be made public, if you want to grab the source it is available here. Full Article

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Benchmarking: Introduction

Tags: ActionScript 3.0 Benchmarks.

Not everyone needs to worry about writing the most optimized code. In fact, if you are programming Flash websites or small projects you probably should not be concerned with it – some would even argue that it would be inefficient since more optimized code takes more care to write. However, there are those projects that are large or complex enough that it is essential, and many times, we have a very vague idea of where to draw the line between simple and complex. Full Article

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